About

Female electrical engineering senior design team with final project, Spring 2018

Electrical Engineering, Computer Science and Computer Engineering continue to be attractive and lucrative professions with rich traditions in the design, development, testing and commercialization of cellular and information highway technology; command, control and delivery of power of high speed machines, digital networks, microprocessors and supercomputers, materials such as superconductors and bio-materials, and VLSI circuits for consumer and industrial electronic applications.

The Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (EECS) is organized internally into two informal divisions: Electrical and Computer Engineering; and Computer Science (CS). The Department offers seven degree programs: the Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering, and Bachelor of Science in Computer Science; the Master of Science in Electrical Engineering and Master of Science in Computer Science; and Doctor of Philosophy in either Electrical Engineering or Computer Science. The Department of EECS covers a range of academic areas including, but not limited to, software, computer gaming, artificial intelligence (AI), computation, computer systems, networking materials, control, power systems, signal processing, imaging, systems analysis, electronic devices, circuits, and processors.

The Department of EECS is dedicated to developing high-quality graduates who will take positions of leadership as their careers advance. Our graduates work in leading-edge businesses in a variety of technology sectors, including manufacturing and automation, computer and internet, automotive and aerospace, defense, finance, energy, and consulting.

News

Martin Conquers Hackathons with Accessibility Software

Wed, February 12, 2020

Computer Engineering Freshman Devin C. Martin recently conquered at two hackathons: HackHarvard at Harvard University and HackDuke – Code for Good at Duke University. Martin came in third place for Hack Harvard, which had over 400 international participants from across five continents. For HackDuke, Martin placed first among over 300 participants from the nation's top engineering schools, such as the Georgia Institute of Technology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, New York University, and Yale University. The participants for each hackathon included both undergraduate and graduate students. Read More >>

Assistant Professor Su Yan Receives 2020 ACES Early Career Award

Thu, January 30, 2020

Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Assistant Professor Su Yan recently received the 2020 Applied Computational Electromagnetics Society (ACES) Early Career Award “for contributions to linear and nonlinear electromagnetic and multiphysics modeling and simulation methods.”Read More >>

Events

No Events